Tota pulchra es, amica mea (Pierre de Manchicourt)

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  • (Posted 2019-12-21)   CPDL #56370:     
Editor: Andrew Fysh (submitted 2019-12-21).   Score information: A4, 16 pages, 323 kB   Copyright: CC BY SA
Edition notes: Transposed one tone lower (for SSATBB), otherwise identical to CPDL #56369 below.
  • (Posted 2019-12-21)   CPDL #56369:     
Editor: Andrew Fysh (submitted 2019-12-21).   Score information: A4, 16 pages, 319 kB   Copyright: CC BY SA
Edition notes: At original pitch (for SSATBB). Original note values retained. Transcribed and edited from the printed source listed below.

General Information

Title: Tota pulchra es, amica mea (2.p. Flores apparuerunt)
Composer: Pierre de Manchicourt
Source of text: Song of Songs 2 & 4

Number of voices: 6vv   Voicing: SSATBB
Genre: SacredMotetAntiphon for the Feast of the Assumption or for the Nativity of the BVM

Language: Latin
Instruments: A cappella

First published: 1554 in Phalèse, Cantionum sacrarum liber 5 (Pierre de Manchicourt), no. 11

Description: This is one of seven settings of text from the Song of Songs (Canticum Canticorum) among Manchicourt's output of more than seventy motets.

Original text and translations

Latin.png Latin text

Tota pulchra es, amíca mea,
   et mácula non est in te.
Favus distíllans lábia tua;
   mel et lac sub lingua tua.
Odor unguentórum tuórum
   super ómnia arómata.
      Veni, veni de Líbano, veni, coronáberis.

Flores apparuérunt,
   víneae floréntes odórem dedérunt.
Et vox túrturis audíta est in terra nostra.
Surge, própera, amíca mea,
      veni, veni de Líbano, veni, coronáberis.

English.png English translation

Thou art all fair, my love;
   and there is no spot in thee.
Thy lips drop as the honeycomb;
   honey and milk are under thy tongue.
The sweet smell of thy ointments
   is above all manner of spices.
      Come, come from Libanus, come, thou shalt be crowned."

The flowers have appeared,
   the blossoming vines have yielded their fragrance.
And the voice of the turtle dove is heard in our land.
Arise, make haste, my love,
      come, come from Libanus, come, thou shalt be crowned."

Original text and translations may be found at Tota pulchra es, amica mea.