Anna Barbauld

From ChoralWiki
Revision as of 05:07, 9 April 2018 by Claude T (talk | contribs) (Text replacement - "..." to "…")
Jump to: navigation, search

Life

Born: 20 June 1743, Leicestershire, England

Died: 9 March 1825, Hampstead, England

Biography

Anna Barbauld was a daughter of the Rev. John Ailrin, a dissenting minister… In 1753 Dr. Aikin became classical tutor at a dissenting academy at Warrington. During her residence there she contributed five hymns to Dr. W. Enfield's Hymns for Public Worship. In the following year these were included in her Poems. In May, 1774, Miss Aikin was married to the Rev. Rochemont Barbauld, a descendant of a French Protestant family, and a dissenting minister. For some years Mr. Barbauld conducted, in addition to his pastoral work, a boarding school at Palgrave, Suffolk. From this he retired in 1785. … Mrs. Barbauld continued to reside in the neighborhood until her death. … As a writer of hymns Mrs. Barbauld was eminently successful" (Julian 1907).
"She was a noted teacher at the Palgrave Academy and an innovative children's writer; her primers provided a model for pedagogy for more than a century. Her essays demonstrated that it was possible for a woman to be publicly engaged in politics, and other women authors emulated her. Barbauld's literary career spanned numerous periods in British literary history: her work promoted the values of both the Enlightenment and Sensibility, and her poetry was foundational to the development of British Romanticism. Barbauld was also a literary critic, and her anthology of 18th-century British novels helped establish the canon as known today. Barbauld's career as a poet ended abruptly in 1812 with the publication of Eighteen Hundred and Eleven, which criticized Britain's participation in the Napoleonic Wars. Vicious reviews shocked Barbauld, and she published nothing else during her lifetime" (Wikipedia)

View the Wikipedia article on Anna Barbauld.

Musical settings of literary works

Publications

External links

add web links here